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Planet Survives Its Own Star

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Planet Survives Its Own Star

The planet, named WD 1856 B, is about seven times the size of the star it orbits. WD 1856 B is quite close to the remains of its star, but may have survived the death of this star. This is the first time that astronomers have observed such a thing. The researchers do not yet know how this is possible.

The planet, named WD 1856 B, is about seven times the size of the star it orbits. WD 1856 B is quite close to the remains of its star, but may have survived the death of this star. This is the first time that astronomers have observed such a thing. The researchers do not yet know how this is possible.

It is possible that the planet first moved further away from the star, but because other celestial bodies with a heavy gravitational field (so have a lot of mass) "pulled" the planet closer to the star.

White dwarfs are dead star cores

White dwarfs are the cores of dead stars. When a star dies, it expands first and it becomes a red giant. Then it sheds its outer shell, until a core remains.

It was thought that the closest planets were lost when that shell was shed. In addition, the white dwarfs may attract smaller celestial objects such as asteroids and comets, but these are then pulverized by the white dwarf's gravity into a disc of dust. But it seems that WD 1856 managed to survive all this.

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